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Polilla Polifemo Antheraea polyphemus

Observ.

alias001

Fecha

Junio 19, 2020 09:41 AM PDT

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Rana-de Coro del Pacífico Pseudacris regilla

Observ.

vail

Fecha

Noviembre 20, 2019 08:56 PM UTC

Descripción

Tree Frog on a Puffball Mushroom.

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Lupinos Género Lupinus

Observ.

vivienneo

Fecha

Marzo 6, 2015 10:16 AM PST

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Gavilán de Cooper Accipiter cooperii

Observ.

johnkarges

Fecha

Noviembre 6, 2016 02:07 PM CST

Descripción

Melanistic juvenile (likely male based on size relative to the Great-tailed Grackle it was feeding upon). Verified by William Clark, and Lance and Jill Morrow. First observed by M. Silvas with me, and I shouted "melanistic Cooper's Hawk, OMG" as I identified the bird preliminarily, before submitting it to experts for review.
N31.070728 W-97.369269
JPK-2925

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Ganso Canadiense Menor Branta hutchinsii

Observ.

the-catfinch

Fecha

Noviembre 25, 2017 12:18 PM PST

Descripción

an ebird reviewer flagged an observation of mine with this photo when I listed it as cackling goose so I am no longer certain of an ID.

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Verdugo Americano Lanius ludovicianus

Observ.

chartuso

Fecha

Julio 8, 2016 05:09 PM MDT

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Grévol Engolado Bonasa umbellus

Observ.

the-catfinch

Fecha

Octubre 30, 2017 07:28 AM PDT

Descripción

Somehow, this grouse flew into our window. I have no idea why he was in our area, nor any idea why he was flying but he crashed into our window anyways. After that he took a 2 hour long nap and then strutted away into our woods. I think he will be fine.

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Águila Pescadora Pandion haliaetus

Observ.

rachelrodell

Fecha

Julio 31, 2017 01:33 PM CDT

Descripción

Young osprey had head stuck in grate. Was removed by hand and released. Immediately rejoined the nest in adjoining field

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Chorlo Tildío Charadrius vociferus

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Julio 20, 2017 12:27 PM PDT

Descripción

The is a mother and three baby killdeer feeding off of the bacteria in the Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park.

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Andrómeda de Pino Pterospora andromedea

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Julio 2, 2017 03:28 PM PDT

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Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Junio 20, 2017 03:52 PM PDT

Descripción

3 or 4 of these were buried in the ground. This one was the most complete. The shell is about 5-6 in. or 13-15 cm. long, and about 2 in. or 5 cm. wide.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

jody15

Fecha

Junio 16, 2017 11:26 AM PDT

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Square

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bhawn18

Fecha

Junio 9, 2017 12:10 PM PDT

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Camaleón de Cuernos Cornos Phrynosoma douglasii

Observ.

bhawn18

Fecha

Mayo 31, 2017 02:45 PM PDT

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Ballena Jorobada Megaptera novaeangliae

Observ.

jmaughn

Fecha

Junio 1, 2017 09:48 AM PDT

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Square

Observ.

bhawn18

Fecha

Mayo 31, 2017 03:56 PM PDT

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Avoceta Americana Recurvirostra americana

Observ.

andybridges

Fecha

Mayo 21, 2017 07:10 PM MDT

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Rana Leopardo Norteña Lithobates pipiens

Observ.

gshugart

Fecha

Agosto 1, 2014 08:34 AM PDT

Descripción

I assumed these were extirpated by recent (past 10 years) incursion of bullfrogs into north Potholes Reservoir. I've been doing week long camping/surveys at this spot and region since 1992. None were seen in 2013 but at least four were found in traditional pre-bullfrog spot in 2014. This is one area of Washington state where Northern Leopard Frogs were historically found. (No data for 2008 or 2015-16). (edited May 2017)

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

damontighe

Fecha

Abril 14, 2014 04:49 PM PDT

Descripción

golden currant (Ribes aureum) above Palouse Falls, Palouse Falls State Park, Washington

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Planta de Hielo Carpobrotus edulis

Observ.

sea-kangaroo

Fecha

Abril 27, 2017 01:10 PM PDT

Etiquetas

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Square

Observ.

jmaughn

Fecha

Mayo 17, 2017

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Polilla Polifemo Antheraea polyphemus

Observ.

kave

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2017 07:28 PM PDT

Descripción

Just hatched today

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

alfredo13

Fecha

Mayo 9, 2017 09:42 AM CDT

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Mariposa Joya Banda Amarilla Hypophylla zeurippa

Observ.

magazhu

Fecha

Mayo 1, 2017

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Square

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Verdugo Americano Lanius ludovicianus

Fecha

Mayo 3, 2017 05:07 PM CDT

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Verdugo Americano Lanius ludovicianus

Observ.

claydemler

Fecha

Abril 29, 2017 03:24 PM CDT

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Square

Observ.

madison

Fecha

Abril 22, 2014

Descripción

Exploration of the Cratageous Columbiana from the Rosaceae Family

The Rosaceae family claims a diverse variety of angiosperm plants. Despite all these species differences, though, they all share a few common phenotypes that place them in the Rosaceae family. The species columbiana especially is set apart from the additional members of Rosaceae due to its morphological differences, and preferred habitat.
To begin, all the species in the Rosaceae family have certain qualities that place in this unit. These characteristics consist of the flowers normally having five petals, and the plants having bracteolate between the plants lobes. When the plants are born they will have petals on the calyx and when in the Rosaceae family they will be either deciduous or evergreen. Sometimes these plants are armed and they mostly have stipulate leaves. They are typically trees or shrubs.
The plant Cratageous columbiana separates itself from the rest of the Rosaceae family with key qualities. These include styles that normally number in 10 and stamens that number from 10-20. The major defining phenotype of this plant is their thorns that grow 4-7 centimeters in length. columbiana is also a woody shrub plant, and as a result has long thick roots and branches.
The key elements that most clearly differentiate the columbiana species from the others I collected are seen in variations. The major defining characteristic of the columbiana is it’s 4-7 cm thorns. Other armed plants typically have 1-2 cm. The Rosaceae plants that aren’t armed are diverse by the shape and complexities of their flowers. An example of this is the species triflorum, instead of flowers in clusters- such as the columbiana- it has bowl or vase shaped flowers. These are a just a few of the many morphological traits.
To continue, due to the fact plants in the Rosaceae family are angiosperms, they reproduce through pollination. To achieve reproduction, the flower needs certain reproductive organs. These include the pistil and stamen, which consist of many other smaller elements to create the whole. To begin the process of reproduction, angiosperms contain the sperm of a flower on the anther. This pollen grain then gets transferred to another flower, commonly by insects. The Rosaceae’s showy flowers draw them in and the pollen is transitioned from the insect to the stigma. From the stigma, the pollen grains then travel down the style to the ovary. A seed is then created in the ovule and is then introduced to the world through the fruits the Rosaceae Family bears.
Because of these characteristics, this plant is commonly found in warmer habitats. These habitats commonly are rocky areas with plenty of sun exposure and located on steep slopes. One of the many reasons columbiana thrives in this environment is because of its long woody roots. They penetrate through the rocky ground and are able to reach water; also by having woody limbs the plant can store water easier. The location I found Cratageous columbiana fitted the idealistic habitat for this species, and was located in Troy, Oregon.
To continue; the interesting adaptations the columbiana species has developed vs. the other Rosaceae species is unique. As previously stated, the columbiana has abnormally long thorns, and prefers dryer habitats. This greatly differs with the characteristics of the triflorum, which prefer moist habitats and has moderately short- though thick, roots. In all, the Cratageous columbiana is very diverse, and has notable and intriguing characteristics.
Refrences:
The Pacific North West Flora book
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/plants/printouts/floweranatomy.shtml
http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/A/Angiosperm.html

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

bette1

Fecha

Abril 22, 2014

Descripción

EXPLORATION OF THE AMELANCHIER ALNIFOLIA FROM THE ROSACEA FAMILY

Amelanchier alnifolia is a plant that is in the Rosacea family commonly named as the alder-leaved serviceberry. Also called a Juneberry since its growing season is near the end of June and early July. It is considered a showy shrub because of its white lilac looking flowers that are in numerous amounts on the shrub. The shrub also grows fruits similar to blueberries.
Members of the Rosacea plant including the Amelanchier alnifolia are woody plants. The shrub grows numerous amounts of white flowers that can range in colors of yellow, pink, orange, red or lavender. These flowers can range in size, shape and color depending on the habitat conditions. The flowers are cup-shaped with five petals. They are also randomly placed on the stems and are radially symmetric. The center of the flower is green and contains stamens and carpels. There are normally only four or five sepals for each flower. Each flower contains a hypanthium; the area where the calyx, stamens and corolla are fused together to form a cup shape that surrounds the stem. The bark on the tree is smooth and grayish in color. The leaves on the shrub are light green on the surface and pale on the bottom. The leaves are fan-shaped with toothed margins and grow alternately on the stem. The Amelanchier alnifolia is a perennial plant.
One of the other plants I collected that was similar to the Amelanchier alnifolia is the Crataegus douglasii. Like the Amelanchier alnifolia it is considered a shrub that can grow to be 20 feet to 30 feet tall. Both of the plants have the nearly identical flowers and fan-shaped leaves that have toothed margins. The shrubs are both gray in bark color when mature. Both the plants produce some type of fruit. The difference between the two shrubs is that the Crataegus douglasii has thorns on the stem to protect itself from predators. The leaves on the douglasii are darker green unlike the alnifolia leaves.
Amelanchier alnifolia reproduce by sexual reproduction. A pollen grain from one type of plant lands on the ovary and pollination occurs. A pollen tube forms and grows into the ovule. Mitosis occurs forming a sperm that will travel down the pollen tube to fertilize an egg. An embryo and endosperm are made which will undergo photosynthesis to develop a seed sprout. The seed will then grow to become a fruit.
Amelanchier alnifolia grows on the North American continent in the west and central parts of the Unites States. It is found on a variety of landscapes ranging from a dry slope, moist hillsides, and wide prairies. The shrub can also be found growing close to other wild roses or shrubby plants. In different types of condition the Amelanchier alnofolia will adjust as needed to grow. With the correct conditions the deciduous shrub can grow to be a large tree with a height of 35 feet and width of 20 feet. I found my collection at Wenaha River Trail in Troy, Oregon. The shrub was on a hillside surrounded by grass and other shrubs. The soil contained rocks and contained a sufficient amount of water for the plant to grow. It had access to direct sunlight and rain.
Some adaptations that Rosacea plants have made are that they have developed thorns to protect their fruits from predators. The shrubs have also adjusted to growing in different types of habitats. The flowers have changed from white into yellow and blue flowers to attract bees to pollinate it. They also have strong scents to attract animals that will be able to pollinate it.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Polilla Tigre Mexicana Apantesis proxima

Observ.

sea-kangaroo

Fecha

Abril 23, 2017 10:38 AM PDT

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

mizgreenejeans

Fecha

Abril 25, 2017 03:20 PM PDT

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Lupinos Género Lupinus

Observ.

eddiebug

Fecha

Abril 25, 2017 12:16 PM PDT

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

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Verdugo Americano Lanius ludovicianus

Observ.

mrfish33

Fecha

Abril 9, 2017 10:57 AM PDT

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Lupinos Género Lupinus

Observ.

kestrel

Fecha

Abril 10, 2017 03:59 PM PDT

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Square

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Verdugo Americano Lanius ludovicianus

Observ.

genare

Fecha

Marzo 29, 2017 11:53 AM CDT

Descripción

Fledgling out of place at a strip mall. Called in to rescue. He was being watching by an adult so I left him in a tree where he was cared for. I'm a USFWS biologist with permits.

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Sauce de Hojas Angostas Salix exigua

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Junio 1, 2015

Lugar

Yakima, WA (Google, OSM)
Birds

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Qué

Aves Clase Aves

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Marzo 16, 2017 06:51 AM PDT

Descripción

This may be very hard to id, but its the best I could do. The wings and head are black. The rest of the body is white. It is a little bit bigger than a kestrel. It flew in to the tree like a macaw and perches like one to.

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Pingüino de Ojo Amarillo Megadyptes antipodes

Observ.

tam_topes

Fecha

Enero 9, 2011 03:08 PM +13

Descripción

Adult with juvenile

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Square

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Rotíferos Filo Rotifera

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Enero 29, 2017 04:14 PM PST

Lugar

Yakima (Google, OSM)

Descripción

I found this in my fish tank. There was a bull frog tadpole from the Yakima river, in the aquarium. So may this little creature was in the river at one point.

Behavior:
Uses hairs along mouth to create a current into it's mouth. It tends to swim in circles.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Agosto 2, 2016 08:00 PM PDT

Descripción

White flowers.This is a small branch of a medium size bush. The way the leaves and branches were arranged was similar to a rhododendron.

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Lupinos Género Lupinus

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Agosto 2, 2016

Descripción

White with a small blue dot on tip of flower. Woody stem. Broad dark green leaves.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

jonathan_kolby

Fecha

Abril 12, 2012

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

johnb-nz

Fecha

Julio 29, 2015

Descripción

A second bird was observed same day in a paddock (high tide) near Collingwood.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

annikaml

Fecha

Julio 24, 2015 11:09 AM CDT

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Carpintero Enmascarado Melanerpes chrysogenys

Observ.

magazhu

Fecha

Septiembre 17, 2015

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Square

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Picogordo Tigrillo Pheucticus melanocephalus

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Agosto 9, 2015

Lugar

Yakima WA (Google, OSM)

Descripción

It's about the size of a robin, and it has a crest.

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Culebra Cola Larga del Pacífico Enulius flavitorques

Observ.

herpguy

Fecha

Mayo 27, 1988

Descripción

This juvenile snake was observed crossing the road at night 4 km west of Canas, in northwestern Costa Rica.

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Serpiente Ciega Afroasiática Indotyphlops braminus

Observ.

herpguy

Fecha

Junio 6, 2013

Descripción

This juvenile blindsnake was found during the day under a rock in a meadow in the Agumbe Research Station in the Western Ghats of southwest India.

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Square

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Avoceta Americana Recurvirostra americana

Observ.

hfabian

Fecha

Junio 28, 2015

Descripción

Nesting nearby.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

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Ardillón de California Otospermophilus beecheyi

Observ.

hfabian

Fecha

Junio 28, 2015

Descripción

Standing in New Zealand Spinach.

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Square

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Pato Norteño Anas platyrhynchos

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Falta la fecha

Descripción

A female malard duck in a pond

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Zorro Rojo Vulpes vulpes

Observ.

elham

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2015

Descripción

In the second day I used my Canon, so I could take closer pictures but with less quality!
Their mom always stared at me for long minutes to ensure there is no danger for them.
Children were fighting with each other as usual when their dad came back and suddenly all of them ran to him and gave him a warm welcome!
They often eat little birds, rats and fruits and insects as well.
In the last picture you can see 4 of them in one shot, the forth is down and left behind the plants.

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Zorro Rojo Vulpes vulpes

Observ.

elham

Fecha

Mayo 8, 2015

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Zorro Rojo Vulpes vulpes

Observ.

elham

Fecha

Mayo 12, 2015

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Square

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Calamón Takahe Porphyrio hochstetteri

Observ.

school

Fecha

Junio 29, 2015 11:46 AM NZST

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Square

Observ.

brewbooks

Fecha

Junio 27, 2015 11:06 AM PDT

Descripción

Lupinus latifolius
Broadleaf Lupine
Elevation 1445 meters (4750 feet)
Park Butte Trail #603
Mt. Baker Wilderness
Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
IMG_20150627_110606

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

camelcreek

Fecha

Junio 17, 2015 12:02 AM EDT

Descripción

Brief description of what you observed

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

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Foca Monje de Hawái Neomonachus schauinslandi

Observ.

marksullivan

Fecha

Junio 20, 2015 03:04 PM HST

Descripción

RL54 Hooked

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Lobo Rojo Canis rufus

Fecha

Octubre 30, 2014

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

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Espolonero Chinquis Polyplectron bicalcaratum

Fecha

Abril 8, 2015

Descripción

Killed by Mro villager.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Lobo Rojo Canis rufus

Observ.

red_wolf

Fecha

Falta la fecha

Descripción

One of the red wolf's in the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium breeding program.

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

maundering

Fecha

Abril 2, 2009 09:39 AM PDT

Descripción

Dodecatheon hendersonii
Shooting Star
Henderson's Shooting Star
Mosquito Bills

Backpacking trip from Del Valle Regional Park to Murietta Falls and Stewart's Camp in the Ohlone Regional Wilderness, April 2 & 3, 2009

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Estrelladas Género Aster

Observ.

maundering

Fecha

Septiembre 30, 2006

Descripción

taken in Mineral King Valley in Sequoia National Park, Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, Central California.

Possibly Western Mountain Aster, Aster occidentalis or Hoary Aster, Machaeranthera canescens ??? Wandering Daisy, Erigeron peregrinus?