Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pavón Grande (Crax rubra)

Observ.

danjleavitt

Fecha

Abril 2020

Descripción

Observed by Ryan, who contacted the zoo. Who said they were not missing a Curassow...very odd situation

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Saltamonte Perezoso Norteamericano (Taeniopoda eques)

Observ.

erstadh

Fecha

Septiembre 24, 2022 03:43 PM MDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

conboy

Fecha

Febrero 16, 2020 04:47 PM EST

Descripción

Spotted Lanternfly dead, stuck to Ailanthus altissima tree. Using information from a recent Cornell paper finding two native species of pathogenic fungus that kill SLF, I believe this to be Batkoa major (currently only the genus Batkoa is in iNaturalist. I would need a curator to add this species B. major). About 97% of dead SLF stuck to trees were due to infection of B. major in this study in PA. Here’s a link to the paper - https://www.pnas.org/content/116/19/9178
I inspected the cadaver rather closely and it appears to have had white, fuzzy fungal growth on the underside and near the face. Any help or discussion is welcome! Thanks :)

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Mosca Flotadora de Cuatro Manchas (Dioprosopa clavata)

Observ.

vholland71

Fecha

Agosto 13, 2022 10:41 AM PDT

Descripción

On milkweed leaf

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Carpintero Castaño (Celeus castaneus)

Observ.

milwjeff

Fecha

Julio 26, 2022 03:30 PM CST

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

thebeachcomber

Fecha

Marzo 30, 2021 11:50 AM AEDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

hortje

Fecha

Octubre 27, 2018

Descripción

What is it?
Identified as Lepismatidae on Bowerbird by Matthew Connors: "Wow, that is stunning! I've never seen or even heard of a silverfish like it - fantastic find"

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Chipe Cara Roja (Cardellina rubrifrons)

Observ.

milwjeff

Fecha

Junio 10, 2022 08:26 AM MDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pato Tepalcate (Oxyura jamaicensis)

Observ.

milwjeff

Fecha

Junio 3, 2022 03:19 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

matthew_connors

Fecha

Junio 17, 2018 02:49 PM AEST

Descripción

Last true bug for now! What's this crazy little guy? I reckon an assassin bug or something related, but I will need to confirm. Using this key with the features: Labium resting in a curved position; labium inserted at front or under front of head; and head unmodified (without pedunculate eyes); this yields only Nabidae and Reduviidae. A quick look through the Australian Nabidae genera results in nothing remotely similar, so it is indeed a reduviid! Australia has quite a few reduviids, so I will need to work a bit harder here.

Very luckily, there is an excellent illustrated key to Reduviidae subfamilies and tribes here. Australia has the following twelve subfamilies: Ectrichodiinae, Emesinae, Epiroderinae (in the key as the synonym Physoderinae), Harpactorinae, Holoptilinae, Peiratinae, Reduviinae, Saicinae, Stenopodainae, Tegeinae (in the key as a tribe of Harpactorinae), Triatominae, and Visayanocorinae. It would also seem that the subfamily Tribelocephalinae has been split from Ectrichodiinae (listed in ALA as a tribe), so we should look out for that one too. Right off the bat Visayanocorinae looks promising, but we will go through the key anyway and see if we can be definitive about it. Okay, let's start the key. The first character we can skip (4 visible rostral segments vs 3) because all Australian subfamilies have 3 visible rostral segments. On to character 3. I am honestly very surprised that the wing venation is clear enough here to see that there is no quadrate/pentagonal/hexagonal cubitus, so we can rule out Stenopodainae and Harpactorinae (and Tegeinae by that). Character 5 we can skip because Australia has no Chryxinae, but the characters do indeed fit (labium elongate, membrane with >1 cell). Character 6 unfortunately I do not think we can see properly - the presence or absence of fossula spongiosa on the foretibiae. The foretibia certainly looks expanded at the apex, but is that fossula spongiosa or is that just expansion? We will have to follow both paths and hope that it is easy to pick between them at the end.

We'll follow the 'absent' path first, so on to character 7. The next is easy; there is no long setation on the legs and antennae and the antennae are clearly four-segmented, so Holoptilinae is out (and it helps that I just went through them). Character 8 is also fairly easy - there is no prominent spur on the front of the foretibia, and in fact the expansion of the foretibia seems to be a ventral one. So Epiroderinae is out. Character 10 - the second visible labial segment is distinctly curved, but this eliminates only part of Triatominae so we will leave it in for now and proceed to the next character. Character 11 is even easier (body not flat and membrane without 3 ending veins) but it unfortunately only rules out a non-Australian subfamily. Character 12 rules out Tribelocephalinae, as our bug is not woolly and does not have the pedicel folded underneath the scape. For characters 13 and 15 (14 does not apply to us) we have the same situation as with character 11 but I will not write them out. Character 16 - does the foretibia have a ventral spur? It would appear to have one, but I am not 100% certain. Yes leads us to Character 17, where we have Visayanocorinae and the non-Australian Vesciinae. Following that (first visible labial segment much longer than second) we do indeed get Visayanocorinae, which is my suspicion as to the correct ID. Following 'no' for the foretibial ventral spur, Character 18 asks us about the presence or absence of ocelli, which of course we cannot see. Luckily, following 'present' only gives us non-Australian subfamilies. Following 'absent', we can easily rule out Emesinae (short forecoxa) but we get Saicinae (although the lack of bulbous 2nd visible labial segment is evidence against it).

What if we say the fossula spongiosa are present? The transverse sulcus on the pronotum is at the middle, so by Character 21 we rule out Peiratinae. Character 22 is the same as Character 10 so we again rule out part of Triatominae. I would expect this is it for them but we'll keep them in just in case there's a third part. The scutellum has no paired posteriorly-projecting prongs (and it looks like there are no pseudosegments in the antennae), so we can rule out Ectrichodiinae with Character 23. Character 24 is a bit more difficult - does this have the "head usually elongate; if short, then eyes usually reniform and neither strongly pedunculate nor covering almost the entire lateral surface of the head", or does it have the "head short, with semi-globular eyes that are either medium-sized and slightly to strongly pedunculate or large and almost covering the entire lateral surface of the head"? It does not really appear to fit either option - the head is elongate but the eyes are quite large. However, this is the last relevant key character for us - the first option leads to Reduviinae and the second leads only to several non-Australian subfamilies. So we finish the subfamilial key, and we can rule out Triatominae for good. I think we will keep Reduviinae for now though.

Okay, so we have three subfamilies to check - Reduviinae, Saicinae, and Visayanocorinae. I think we can safely rule out Reduviinae as they are very robust insects, and a quick check of all the Australian genera reveals nothing even remotely similar to this one. Okay, so Saicinae and Visayanocorinae. What does the key have to say about these two?

For Saicinae:

"Saicinae are diagnosed by the absence of ocelli and fossula spongiosa, the second visible labial segment frequently expanded and basally bulbous, the forecoxa at most 3 times as long as wide, the usually enlarged and slightly bulbous tarsal segments, the acetabulum of the foreleg oriented ventrad, and the opposing surfaces of head and labium frequently with stiff setae or spines."

For Visayanocorinae:

"Visayanocorinae are characterized by a foretibial spur projecting beyond the tarsal insertion, the small size, a very long second (first visible) labial segment, long second tarsomere, and the scape longer than the head. Members of this subfamily also have very smooth cuticle and lack ocelli and an anteocular sulcus."

So certainly this is a very much better match for Visayanocorinae. What are the options for Saicinae though? Only two genera, Micropolytoxus (3 spp.) and Polytoxus (4 spp.). Going by this paper, Polytoxus has a pair of long spines on the pronotum, so that is out. From the same paper it also seems that Micropolytoxus is rather different, being paler and with some small spines. So Visayanocorinae it is!

In Australia we have only two species of Visayanocorinae (and only about ten in the whole world!), Carayonia australiensis and Wardamanocoris formosus. Both were described in the same paper, specifically this one. And luckily it is very easy to distinguish the two! W. formosus is quite a different species, and is only known from NT anyway, whereas C. australiensis matches well and has been found not far away. So I am very happy with that. And as far as I can tell, these are the first live photos of not just this species or genus, but of this entire subfamily! So that's really cool. And indeed the only other photographs of specimens I can find at all are the ones in the key I used and this one from Africa. Double cool!

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

simono

Fecha

Octubre 28, 2020 09:05 PM AWST

Descripción

This 35cm mullet must have gotten stuck in the undercarriage of my vehicle when I went through the Ivanhoe Crossing in the evening. The stench by Friday morning alerted me and I managed to drag it out. Damaged the head somewhat trying to hook it out with a fish hook and line as I could not pull it backwards.

Ew.

Well, I guess I'm in the unique position of having killed a fish...with a ute.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

neylon

Fecha

Junio 23, 2021 08:00 AM CDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

kailh

Fecha

Junio 16, 2021 01:52 PM PDT

Descripción

Circa 1/4" to 3/8" long

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

alice_abela

Fecha

Marzo 13, 2022 10:05 AM PDT

Descripción

Clear Creek area, San Benito County, California

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

alice_abela

Fecha

Febrero 2022

Descripción

Santa Barbara County, California.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Moscas de Los Murciélagos (Familia Streblidae)

Observ.

hubertszcz

Fecha

Octubre 5, 2019 06:14 PM CST

Descripción

A fer-de-lance (Bothrops asper) eating their host bat (most likely Trachops cirrhosus) is causing some major trepidation for these parasitic Streblid flies.

Check out my paper on this observation here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/342792286_When_the_hunter_becomes_the_hunted_foraging_bat_attacked_by_pit_viper_at_frog_chorus

Observation of the fer-de-lance: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/52429696

Observation of the same species of bat: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/52429697

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

kueda

Fecha

Enero 22, 2022 12:14 PM PST

Descripción

Unfortunately it dropped off the rock and disappeared before I could get a pic of the telson, but... could this be Venezillo microphthalmus?

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Águila Cabeza Blanca (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Observ.

erstadh

Fecha

Enero 29, 2022 01:32 PM UTC

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Gavilán Rastrero (Circus hudsonius)

Observ.

erstadh

Fecha

Enero 2022

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Araña Asiática Joro (Trichonephila clavata)

Observ.

aok3000

Fecha

Noviembre 26, 2021 11:24 AM UTC

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Chapulín Arcoiris (Dactylotum bicolor)

Observ.

erstadh

Fecha

Noviembre 13, 2021 03:44 PM MST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Culebra Verde Rugosa (Opheodrys aestivus)

Observ.

tothemax

Fecha

Junio 29, 2019 03:20 PM PDT

Descripción

Rough Greensnake catching an orbweaver spider. It got close to the web and then stayed there for what felt like 10 minutes (not sure it was waiting to figure out how to catch the spider or because I had disturbed it). After a while, it finally caught the spider and seemed to have no trouble eating it. My first time seeing a wild snake catch its prey!

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

bun-floof

Fecha

Mayo 18, 2014 11:07 AM PDT

Descripción

A large gray beetle that appeared at night. When it got trapped under the plastic patio table, it flew around, bumping everywhere under the table and buzzing loudly. When I returned, I found it on my dog's bed after possibly stepping on it. It was still alive and seemed fine after putting my 126 pound-supporting leg on it. There seemed to be no damage on the beetle. It did not react when I threw my dog's blanket over it. When turning it over on its back, I saw that it had yellow fuzz on its underside and on parts of its legs. It had short fuzzy red antennae. There is a white mulberry tree nearby, so it could be a fruit-eating beetle. It sometimes makes a spraying sound with its rear. When captured it plays dead very convincingly by stiffening up and making miniscule movements.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

rilested

Fecha

Marzo 27, 2021 09:53 AM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cuervo Casero (Corvus splendens)

Observ.

tomlally

Fecha

Julio 1, 2018 02:59 PM HST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cuervo Hawaiano (Corvus hawaiiensis)

Observ.

abcdefgewing

Fecha

Octubre 1997

Descripción

This photo lost some quality in scanning from an old slide. It shows a wild-born bird. The species is now extinct in the wild.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Hongos con Láminas (Orden Agaricales)

Observ.

joshieboy

Fecha

Enero 19, 2019 03:09 PM PST

Descripción

Mushroom

Other Animals

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Animales (Reino Animalia)

Fecha

Abril 8, 2021 12:35 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

coeller

Fecha

Mayo 24, 2020 10:07 AM CDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

maggiea

Fecha

Mayo 2019

Descripción

Captured during a turtle survey of the Santa Fe River, tagged and released. Weighed 114 lbs, male. Had to be at least 80 years old, guessed to be closer to 100

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cascabel Moteada (Crotalus pyrrhus)

Observ.

kueda

Fecha

Marzo 30, 2015 11:14 AM PDT

Descripción

An outstanding find by Danielle and Tony. Was across the trail but immediately retreated into a bush, which made photography a bit challenging.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pejegato Globo (Cephaloscyllium ventriosum)

Observ.

grace301

Fecha

Abril 25, 2020 05:04 PM PDT

Descripción

Found this little guy on the beach❤️ A shark embryo no clue which species but he is safe under some sea grass

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

raulagrait

Fecha

Febrero 24, 2017 01:33 PM HST

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

stevecollins

Fecha

Agosto 5, 2008 12:34 PM EDT

Descripción

Diogmites neoternatus with a small wasp.

Patuxent Branch Trail, Howard Co., MD

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Avispón Europeo (Vespa crabro)

Fecha

Agosto 26, 2020 07:58 PM ADT

Descripción

A friend from Mayne Island sent this suggesting it was a murder hornet? Thank you to this group for helping identifying it as a European hornet. Found on Mayne Island, BC apparently. See comments below. No I did not take this photo myself.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Mapache (Procyon lotor)

Observ.

lmkento

Fecha

Julio 8, 2017 07:11 PM PDT

Descripción

In the playground at California adventure!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Zapatilla de Venus (Calypso bulbosa)

Observ.

n8agrin

Fecha

Julio 2, 2007 12:00 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

No hay fotos o sonidos

Qué

Junco Espadaña (Schoenoplectus californicus)

Observ.

kueda

Fecha

Marzo 20, 2008 12:00 PM PDT

Descripción

Growing in our office. Maybe this doesn't count since it's captive...

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Caballo (Equus caballus)

Observ.

pinesnake

Fecha

Julio 2016

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Lobo Marino Californiano (Zalophus californianus)

Observ.

bdaniels

Fecha

Agosto 4, 2012

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

g_patil

Fecha

Diciembre 2, 2019 07:26 PM IST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cormorán Orejón (Phalacrocorax auritus)

Observ.

amerikson

Fecha

Noviembre 22, 2020 04:14 PM UTC

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pato Monja (Bucephala albeola)

Observ.

badger8181

Fecha

Febrero 22, 2020 02:20 PM CST
Other Animals

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Animales (Reino Animalia)

Observ.

kaelatyler

Fecha

Febrero 2, 2018 04:08 PM PST
Other Animals

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Animales (Reino Animalia)

Observ.

tony_wills

Fecha

Octubre 25, 2013

Descripción

On a concrete slab in the tidal zone there is a circular hole where some post once stood, life of all sorts has made this a home. There are slight differences between the two shots, taken after successive incoming waves have washed over the slab, tumbling one of the starfish over.

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

upandadam

Fecha

Mayo 22, 2016 04:24 AM PDT
Other Animals

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Animales (Reino Animalia)

Observ.

kimberlysnow

Fecha

Abril 30, 2020 02:23 PM PDT

Descripción

Little slug on top of big slug. They separated as I took photos. I have singular shots as well.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Conejo de Omiltemi (Sylvilagus insonus)

Observ.

stephen220

Fecha

Julio 28, 2009

Descripción

Not at all sure of this one

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Moscas Carroñeras (Familia Sarcophagidae)

Observ.

serpophaga

Fecha

Agosto 30, 2020 08:47 AM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Tiburón Blanco (Carcharodon carcharias)

Observ.

dremsen

Descripción

This is the 15 foot, 1700 lb female Great White that was trapped in the West Gutter of Naushon in 2004. The shark was stranded in the creek for more than two weeks and was a national story.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cazón Espinoso Común (Squalus acanthias)

Observ.

wsweet321

Fecha

Junio 2010

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Perro Doméstico (Canis familiaris ssp. familiaris)

Observ.

diegoalmendras

Fecha

Junio 2020

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Búho Barrado (Strix varia)

Observ.

sarahcarline

Fecha

Enero 16, 2020 10:27 AM EST

Descripción

hunting from nearby tree, about 10:30am, looking intently down at snow, then landed and mantled for a couple of minutes, burying its head into the snow several times before flying off in the opposite direction

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Tecolote Llanero (Athene cunicularia)

Observ.

dwhitec

Fecha

Julio 30, 2015

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Araña Saltarina Verde Enmascarada (Lyssomanes viridis)

Observ.

jesigibbs

Fecha

Mayo 9, 2020 03:21 PM UTC

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Sinsonte Norteño (Mimus polyglottos)

Observ.

dthomasla

Fecha

Junio 6, 2020

Descripción

The squirrel had run along the overhead power lines for at least one city block when the Mockingbird starting harassing it at least 50 yards before arriving in the bird's territory (the area around my house). The mockingbird continued to harass it for another 25 yards past its territory.

The only time I ever see a squirrel in my neighborhood is when they are running along the power lines.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

lcollingsparker

Fecha

Julio 21, 2020 05:54 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

aaron_echols

Fecha

Diciembre 1, 2018 02:19 PM PST

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

aaronbaldwin

Fecha

Mayo 31, 2018 07:45 PM AKDT

Descripción

Attached to cobble snagged by sablefish pots in south Chatham, 653 meters

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Eslizón Rayado de Wahlberg (Trachylepis wahlbergii)

Observ.

jakob

Fecha

Diciembre 1, 2014

Descripción

One of the 2 is fake - guess which one.

Solution for all who are still wondering: The plastic rattle snake has been put in the entrance of the camp kitchen as a deterrent against the local troop of Malbrouck Monkeys, which used to raid the stored food, and surprisingly they never ever entered the kitchen since then.

This skink, however, equipped with astounding cognitive abilities, shows off with his balls of steel.

Err, I think it's a female....

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Abaniquillo Pardo del Caribe (Anolis sagrei)

Observ.

dnoell

Fecha

Febrero 22, 2015

Descripción

Brown anole who fell in love with a fairy!

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Arañas Tejedoras Espinosas (Género Gasteracantha)

Observ.

ivanovdg19

Fecha

Noviembre 17, 2019 05:41 AM MSK

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Arañas Tejedoras Espinosas (Género Gasteracantha)

Observ.

carmelo_lopez

Fecha

Octubre 1, 2013

Descripción

Probably not described.

Currently : Gasteracantha mindanaoensis

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Halcón Esmerejón (Falco columbarius)

Observ.

anudibranchmom

Fecha

Enero 8, 2019 12:23 PM PST

Descripción

Experts - What is going on here? This male American Kestrel sure did seem to have the hots for this female Merlin. He kept trying to get close to her and even brought her a few treats (insects?) from the grass beneath the fence. She accepted the treats but didn't seem thrilled with the attention. However, when he flew off, she followed him...

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

kyletansley

Fecha

Marzo 18, 2019 10:51 AM EDT

Descripción

Cardinal getting territorial with itself in this mirror. It was doing the same thing last week too. It spends a not-insignificant amount of time battling itself.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Polilla de Las Dos Moscas (Macrocilix maia)

Observ.

dhfischer

Fecha

Julio 6, 2019 10:47 AM HST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Polilla Esfinge de Gaudi (Eumorpha labruscae)

Observ.

matteocassella

Fecha

Agosto 6, 2016 01:39 PM HST

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ryanandrews

Fecha

Marzo 2, 2017 12:30 PM PST

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

muir

Fecha

Junio 22, 2018 09:41 PM AKDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Yuca de Chaparral (Hesperoyucca whipplei)

Observ.

justroc

Fecha

Junio 9, 2018 12:04 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Arañas Tejedoras Manchadas (Género Neoscona)

Observ.

marcellagrace

Fecha

Agosto 12, 2019 11:01 AM PDT

Descripción

The story you’re about to hear is true...🙈 😂🤣

I was out driving this morning and I went to put down my sun visor and I encountered this rather large spider in front of my face... while driving! Lol! After recovering from my shock and shutting the visor quickly.
I decided to drive around and find a nice new home for the spider.
So I found a beautiful tree, park the car, capture the spider and place it on the tree about my height level ... welcome to your new home .... but nooooo.... I then watched with my mouth wide open ...thinking where are you going...as it immediately raced down the tree, onto the ground, over to the curb, scaled it, using spider web shooting technique and headed to the street back to the my car where it proceeded to climb onto my tire.🙈

I couldn’t believe my eyes! So yup, there I go ...recapturing the spider ... 😂 put him/her back in the car and after hitting the market, we drove home together. haha! I have now placed her in my garden. Do you think there are spider babies in my car perhaps? I have looked but haven’t seen anything that looks babyish. Lol! I was so shocked and impressed at the same time...and how did you spend your day? 🙈😁 #theyaresmart

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Arañas de Tierra (Familia Gnaphosidae)

Observ.

zoeiv

Fecha

Mayo 25, 2019 07:41 PM CEST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Avispas Caza Tarántulas (Tribu Pepsini)

Observ.

antonyw

Fecha

Septiembre 13, 2009 04:40 PM PDT

Descripción

Saw this very fidgety fast moving wasp searching for tarantulas while we were out for a hike to find some as well.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

andreacala

Fecha

Julio 19, 2019 10:35 AM PDT

Descripción

My first thought was that the Western Gull had stolen an egg, but it was pliable and flexible, certainly uncharacteristic for eggs. The Gull dropped its prey twice, but picked it up again, squeezing hard, releasing blood and fluids, and then finally swallowed it whole. Pictures following are in sequence. The Gull had flown in from the sea, I noticed it because it was pursued by another and both where squeaking excitedly.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Hormigas (Familia Formicidae)

Observ.

danie143

Fecha

Julio 6, 2019 10:46 AM PDT

Descripción

Ant hill offset ~1 foot right-laterally from M7.1 Ridgecrest earthquake this weekend. My hubby took the photo.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Tortuga Pinta (Trachemys scripta ssp. elegans)

Observ.

nelson_wisnik

Fecha

Diciembre 3, 2018

Descripción

in the absence of a trunk or stone to lean on, a capybara may be an option;
I have observed these two individuals do this twice;

see also
https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/nelson_wisnik/21258-the-friendly-capybara

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Marzo 31, 2019 03:34 PM +13

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Tigre de Bengala (Panthera tigris ssp. tigris)

Observ.

indianwildlife

Fecha

Marzo 2018

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

cwwood

Fecha

Agosto 21, 2018 11:47 AM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Rana de Árbol Amarilla (Dendropsophus microcephalus)

Observ.

estebanalzate

Fecha

Septiembre 9, 2016

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

catabbott

Fecha

Noviembre 23, 2018 04:32 AM EST

Descripción

With impala.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

jpleonar

Fecha

Diciembre 15, 2017 11:49 AM EST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Carbonero de Capucha Negra (Poecile atricapillus)

Observ.

tom15

Fecha

Diciembre 5, 2015 10:28 AM EST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Comadreja Colombiana (Neogale felipei)

Observ.

sultana

Fecha

Mayo 2011

Descripción

Atrapada en el baño de una finca

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Culebrera Pechinegra (Circaetus pectoralis)

Observ.

happyasacupcake

Fecha

Mayo 30, 2018 12:20 PM SAST

Descripción

We saw the snake eagle as it flew up from the ground. It flew in slow circles while it controlled and started to eat the snake. One minute from pic 1 to pic 8 where it started to eat the snake. Total time for this series, three minutes.

Snake at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/14774517

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

dongminsung

Fecha

Abril 17, 2017 12:20 PM EDT

Descripción

Confirm?

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

pbrastow

Fecha

Agosto 6, 2017 01:03 PM MDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Lobo Marino Californiano (Zalophus californianus)

Observ.

leptonia

Fecha

Septiembre 7, 2016 07:48 AM PDT

Descripción

with wounds/damage on rear part of body; presumably from a Great White Shark?

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Catarina Convergente (Hippodamia convergens)

Observ.

pmmcnaturalist1

Fecha

Mayo 31, 2012 12:20 PM PDT

Descripción

Lady Beetle on the nose of a northern elephant seal

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Ualabí de Cuello Rojo (Macropus rufogriseus)

Fecha

Agosto 11, 2018 12:00 PM CEST

Descripción

I’ve got a bit of a backlog of observations to upload, but I can’t not upload this one!

After a VERY long kayak trip from Balloch to Inchconachan, I spent about an hour and a half looking for the wild wallabies that live on the island. They were released in the 1940s and have had a stable population ever since, and I’d always wanted to see them (https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/wallabies-of-inchconnachan).

Well, with less than ten minutes before I would have had to reluctantly start the trip back, I saw one! It was bounding through the ferns higher up the island, along one of the tracks they seem to have. I followed it for a while, more listening to the telltale ‘bouncing through undergrowth’ sound than seeing it (they’re fast), and finally was able to get this photo. Well worth the trip!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Aguililla Negra Mayor (Buteogallus urubitinga)

Observ.

javigonz

Fecha

Abril 24, 2018 10:05 AM CDT

Descripción

First sighting around 10:15-20am or so. Was alerted to this very large immature hawk by a mob of grackles that were after it. Bird soared and circled over the lots and continued north with grackles following it. Birder friend, Alex Lamoreaux showed up soon after and after relaying the sighting and jumping in the van to chase, we found the bird soaring over the Louie's Backyard area with the grackle mob in tow. Hawk then returned south and took refuge in the Sheepshead north lot. A bit later bird lifted off and circled the area for a bit and headed north out of sight. First suspicion was immature Common Black Hawk, but following better views, photos, and discussion by other birders present, we reached the conclusion that the ID is Great Black Hawk because of huge size, finely barred tail lacking thick black terminal bands, long legs that it dangled while soaring. White crescents were obvious nearing wing apex and white upper tail coverts were seen and photographed, differentiating it from Common Black Hawk. Coastal habitat and range fits better with Great Black Hawk than Common. ID Confirmed by expert, Bill Clark. Possible 1st US record following review. An incredible and totally unexpected bird!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Bienteveos (Género Myiozetetes)

Observ.

natureinla

Fecha

Octubre 2015

Descripción

Observation and photo by Maya Lopez and Wendy Lopez, sent to nature@nhm.org.

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pez Luna Gigante (Mola tecta)

Observ.

tomleeturner

Fecha

Febrero 19, 2019 05:17 PM PST

Descripción

I am 6 feet from finger tip to finger tip. Big fish!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Helecho Trébol de Agua (Marsilea vestita)

Observ.

merav

Fecha

Diciembre 25, 2016 02:22 PM PST

Descripción

Amphibian eggs?