30 de abril de 2018

Migration Report/Highlights April 2018

The most recent highlight was a trip to John Heinz Wildlife Refuge which included a Northern Waterthrush foraging in the flooded area surrounding the Frog Pond. NOWA was a lifer for me. Also enjoyed seeing a two Brown Thrashers, on the right side of the trail leading to the bird blind.

Recent observations at the BioPond include a Brown Thrasher, Ovenbird, White-throated Sparrow, Black-and-Warbler and Fox Sparrow. On April 18th, I was photographing a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet, when the Fox Sparrow landed right in front of me. I didn't recognize it at first, it because it was sort of out of context, but knew it was something pretty cool. I observed the Brown Thrasher on April 23rd. At first I thought it might be a Wood Thrush, judging by chestnut color. After getting a photo I saw the long beak and distinct yellow/orange eye. A couple of weeks ago a large flock of Cedar Waxwing moved around the BioPond at one point landing on the rocks and railing surrounding the waterfall. One observation about the BioPond is that it seems like there is an effort to manicure if more than in the past. Last year in early on May 3, I observed a Louisiana Waterthrush in some scrubby bushes - but there seems to be a lot less of this type of habitat this year.

Ingresado el 30 de abril de 2018 por joedurrance joedurrance | 6 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

20 de abril de 2017

Spring Migration Report - Cape May Report

One of the highlights of the trip was Friday morning when we spotted dolphins just off shore. We also enjoyed seeing a pair of Oystercatchers with their brilliant orange beaks and sharp contrasting black and white plumage. On Saturday afternoon I parked at South Cape May Meadows and started the loop trail and realized that the two preserves, South Cape May Meadows and Cape May Point State Park are really one large preserve. After tagging along with an official birding group, I took the trail over to the State Park. There were a number of highlights that day including Palm Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Savannah Sparrow (I am always glad to be able to add a new sparrow species to my list), Oystercatchers, Great Egret in green mask breeding plumage and various shorebirds in the fresh water impoundments, Caspian Tern, Greater Yellowlegs. As my hike winded down some hikers gave me a heads up on a Osprey eating a really large fish on a spur trail. Over all a fantastic trip to Cape May.

Ingresado el 20 de abril de 2017 por joedurrance joedurrance | 6 observaciones | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

18 de abril de 2017

Spring Migration 2017 - Report 2: Palm Warblers, Eastern Towhee and White-throated Sparrow

On a quick 15 minute morning (aprox. 8:30-9:00) walk through Woodlands I observed Palm Warblers and plenty of White-throated Sparrow. A few minutes beofre 9:00, at the Biopond I observed a Eastern Towhee kicking up the underbrush, more White-throated Sparrows and what I think was a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Photos to follow). The interesting thing about the sapsucker was the "cryptic" pattern on its back - patchy pattern of black and white.

Ingresado el 18 de abril de 2017 por joedurrance joedurrance | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

07 de abril de 2017

American Woodcocks March 2017

These early migrants started appearing as bird-window collision victims around campus in late February and early March because of a very mild late winter. A snow storm and seasonal cold weather disrupted their migration. On campus we had both window-collision fatalities and 2 rescues (although it may have been the same bird both times). I have been aware of Woodcock activity on campus for a few years, they are among the top victims of bird-building collisions. When I heard that American Woodcocks use Houston Meadow for their complex mating ritual dance I made sure that I made it out there to see it. If I found a Woodcock on campus, I knew they would be active at the meadow that night. I made 3-4 visits and was able to record audio of the "peent" call and the strange whistling sounds that the male makes when ascends and descends.

Fatalities and Rescues on Campus:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5418595
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5434030
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5319190
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5161102
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5600112

Audio Recorded at Houston Meadow:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/5439408

The American Woodcock fallout this spring made the news:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/17/nyregion/an-early-bird-gets-caught-in-the-snowstorm.html?_r=0

Ingresado el 07 de abril de 2017 por joedurrance joedurrance | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

17 de agosto de 2015

Week of May 10-May 16

This week has been all about Ovenbirds. There have been 8 Ovenbirds found around campus, including one which was injured. The injured Ovenbird brought up another issue of what to do when you find an injured bird. I discovered the Ovenbird at Pottruck Gym about 7:45 Thursday 5/14/15 and realized that it was still alive. It was on its back and tried to set up right, but it was too injured. I was not sure how I could help the bird and I was clearly upsetting it, so at that that point I left it to expire in peace. I returned around 1:30 PM and was surprised to find that it was still alive. I called the Schuylkill Wildlife Rehabilitation Center (215) 482-8217 and then (Animal Control (267)-385-3800 to arrange transport of the bird.

Ingresado el 17 de agosto de 2015 por joedurrance joedurrance | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Welcome To The Penn Bird Strikes Project

The Penn Bird Strikes Project: What To Do If You Find A Bird:

Step 1) Document it! Take as many photos of the bird from as many angles as you can. This will help with the identification of the bird. Please include photos showing where the bird was found in relation to the building or windows it may have hit.

Create an account on iNaturalist.org and join the Penn Bird Strikes Project

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/penn-bird-strikes

Add your observation by adding your photos, placing a point on the map, and the following information:

Species of Bird (If Known)
Location (Outside of Which Building or Address – as much detail as possible. )
Date/Time you found the bird

Please email Joe Durrance to let him know you have added a new observation. At josephdurrance@gmail.com

Step 2) Collect it! We would like to collect the birds found during this project at donate them the collection at the Academy of Natural Sciences. If you feel comfortable collecting the bird, put the bird in a plastic ziploc bag (turn bag inside-out to pick up the bird, and then turn it around to seal and close the bag with the bird inside.) Please include a piece of paper inside the bag that has the following information.

Species of Bird (If Known)
Location (Outside of Which Building or Address – as much detail as possible.)
Date/Time you found the bird
Your name and contact information

If you do not feel comfortable handling the dead bird, you can pick it without touching by turning the sandwich ziploc bag inside-out to pick up the bird, and then turn it around to seal and close the bag with the bird inside. If you would prefer not to touch the bird at all, please contact me at josephdurrance@gmail.com, and I will go to the site and collect it.

Step 3) After putting the bird in a bag, if you have a place to freeze the bird, put it in the freezer, until arrangements can be made for me to pick it up.

Thank you,
Joe Durrance
Penn Bird Strikes Project

Ingresado el 17 de agosto de 2015 por joedurrance joedurrance | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

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