Baby Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Yesterday was kind of an interesting day for me. My brother that morning went out with my aunt for a while while doing a Pokemon GO community day event to catch a Squirtle or something to that effect. Anyway they came across a Scissor-tailed flycatcher in a tree in a church parking lot. My aunt was the one who saw it and reported it back to me and later took me to the area it was found. I thought it was just a stand alone. I just knew it was going to be gone by the time we got there; boy was I wrong! My aunt came and picked us up and we headed to the area where she had said she found it. As we came up and circled around we saw a tree the adult had been spotted in but little did we know that we were looking at a nesting site. This was the first time I had ever seen a flycatcher nest but little did I realize I would get more than I bargained for. My aunt parked the car and I got out. I was very careful when I approached the nest. I was back a few feet to better my safety. I have been around these birds long enough to know that Tyrannical flycatchers mean business when it comes to defending their territory and especially their nesting sites. I stayed back as I took my photos and kept my distance. I moved a tad bit closer and discovered a chick with it's head totally exposed out of the nest. If you carefully at the photo you can see part of the wing at the shoulder. I think he might have been using either brother or sister or brother and sister as a stepping stool. Normally these birds can have 3-6 eggs in a clutch. This nest almost seem too little for this chick. What was even funnier was the way the nest was made. It had some kind of cloth which I read on the All About Birds Cornell Lab of Ornithology site to be pretty normal for this bird. The adults thought a dash of fluff from what we think might have come from the donations bin. It had been lined with the fluff and then it had some string and at one end it had a plastic grocery bag. I have seen birds make nests out of crazy things on videos and on wildlife tapes but gosh I never would have guessed that these birds would make hash out of something to line their nests. I guess they wanted what was best for junior. They say a picture is worth a thousand words but there are more that can be said about this one. The chick was even more interesting for when I listened it was making a soft whistle like chirp. I have been around Wrens while they are nesting and their young stay pretty silent when they parents are not feeding them when they go and make a bug run. I know for fact that the parent wrens tell their kids to SHUT UP! so that way predators don't hear them. This Scissor-tail chick apparently didn't get the memo on your out in the open just button that beak! It was kind of a fun photo and I am glad I was able to get about three good shots before cheesing it myself. I didn't know how long it would before another feeding. I have been watching NatGeo wild in recent days and I watch a show called Animals Gone Wild and they tell of some birds actually aiming their beaks at the back of peoples heads. I do not want to be on the receiving end of that assault. I have been pooped on once by a bird and that is not as bad a possibly being bludgeoned or bloodied up by a bird beak. That would not be a good way to spend the day. When getting photos like that don't get too close just keep your distance and make the encounter short, don't try to touch the bird at all. Just leave it alone and make your get away as soon as you can. I remember one day when I was at TCC South Campus a couple of semesters ago I saw two Scissor-tails fighting and they were really going at it. That kind of put some healthy fear into me. Don't tick off a bird or it can get pretty ugly. I may love wildlife but you have to know the playing field and you have to know when to give up. I am saying this to the people who are just starting out with this iNaturalist game who might be inexperienced with it. Learn the animal's behavior before you step out. Remember this is real science and to learn the behavior of your targets is part of the battle before embarking on your mission. Never get too close. I was close enough to where I could see the bird and though I may not be an expert and still a little green I trained myself to look for possible danger. Never let an animal feel uncomfortable that can lead to even bigger danger. Knowing your target's behaviors in any given situation is always key to sucessfully watching them in the wild. I am not say that mistakes don't happen anything can happen but being prepared for what to expect is a good way to go on a hike. It will better you and your abilities to be an iNatter and a good hiker. Babies are fun too look at but some mothers can be pretty defensive never approach a baby animal too closely. If the adults think their young are in danger the results can be pretty dramatic if your not careful. This is just a public service announcement for the younger iNaturalist users not necessarily the adults of course some can benefit from this portion of information. I may not be an expert. No offense intended. Pass this message on if you know someone who is just starting out as a young naturalist or if you are beginning to do iNaturalist. I thought that I could use this photo as a cautionary tale about what could have happened if I hadn't kept my wits about me and cut my observation short. The photo told me all I needed to know that is how I described it so well in detail was from the analysis of the photo. Until next time I am Zachary Chapman.

Publicado por galactic_bug_man galactic_bug_man, 09 de julio de 2018

Observaciones

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Tirano Tijereta Rosado Tyrannus forficatus

Fecha

Julio 8, 2018 03:35 PM CDT

Descripción

My aunt saw a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher come to this nest when she and my brother were out doing Pokemon Go. They came and got me and they took me to this spot. There was another scissor tail at the nest feeding. Once she left I got a little closer and saw that there was something inside the nest. It was a baby Scissor-tail. I had never seen a baby flycatcher before. It was just a little fuzzball. It was so cute. I don't get to see baby birds that often so this was a special treat. Good thing my camera has good zoom. I didn't want to get attacked. These birds can have a bad attitude toward intruders. I stood back and got a few photos and then cheesed it before the parents got wise. Such a cool photo.

Comentarios

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This is a great journal entry, Zach!

Check it out, @elialexautumn ! :)

Publicado por sambiology hace casi 3 años (Marca)
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@galactic_bug_man Great entry my friend! @sambiology Thank you so much for tagging us in this. Up until now the safety analysis we undergo before an adventure has focused on our own safety. You both have shined new light on things for us. Safety for ourselves, safety for the animals, and safety for the habitats we share. I, we, couldnt be more greatful for this journal entry, and being tagged in it. Im going to read it again to make sure I really retain that latter bit. Most execellent photograph bug man! Glad there was a happy ending! Thanks yall!!!

Publicado por needsbettercamera hace casi 3 años (Marca)
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All great points! And Zach, you should check out some of Eli, Alex, and Autumn’s (three people in one screenname!) observations from Florida and Georgia:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&subview=grid&user_id=elialexautumn&verifiable=any

Publicado por sambiology hace casi 3 años (Marca)
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Hey my pleasure. I wrote this and I could hear Marty Stouffer in my head when I wrote this. I am a huge fan of his and his show Wild America and thought I would relay a message that was kind of in the same cadence as to what he said in one of his episodes. I am glad you liked this. His show was one of many I watch religiously as a child and even still. I think it is a great reminder of how animals can be very unpredictable. This is one lesson I wish people would heed and take notice of before stepping out. I have a family member that doesn't give animals their space and it bothers me. I have warned them and warned them but they constantly don't listen to me at all. Thanks for your remarks I really appreciate it.

Publicado por galactic_bug_man hace casi 3 años (Marca)
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@elialexautumn I think it is cool that your son wants to be a Zookeeper. That used to be one of my many former ambitions before I chose the naturalist path. You can say that I was kind of a Zookeeper for I volunteered at the Fort Worth Nature Center in Texas and used to feed the reptiles and things there. Here is a tip for your future Zookeeper. Once he gets old enough let him volunteer for a science center first so he can get the feel of what it is like to care for animals. I love to feed and water the animals when I am at the nature center. I love to handle them too. It will be a cool experience and like my post implies it will let him learn more about the behaviors of wildlife even though they are contained they still have a wild side. I had to learn a great deal about the snakes and things at the center but I learned about all the animals a little bit more and even gave little talks to children when they would come around. To be a zookeeper is all about studying an animals behavioral patterns. It will do you credit and I think your are on the right track. Good luck and if there is anything else you want feel free to follow me at my page. I would love to keep in touch. You are off to great places and Zookeeping is a great job for conservation. Carry on young one.

Publicado por galactic_bug_man hace casi 3 años (Marca)
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@galactic_bug_man Thanks again! I did follow you, and Im going to keep up the observations and encouragement as much as I can. Some editing needed to take place on my profile, but the original sentiment remains. Looking forward to what the future holds for us and the next generation!

Publicado por needsbettercamera hace casi 3 años (Marca)

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