Ecological Survey of Guadalupe River at Wagon's Ford, Guadalupe River, Comal County, TX

On 1/13/18, I made limited biological observations from the Guadalupe River in the vicinity of the Wagon's Ford camping area (Project Locality E, 29.871053, -98.482327).

I was notified upon entering the park that TPWD had released rainbow trout in the river at the park that day, and that many anglers were present.

Conditions were sunny with little or no wind all day, and temps during sampling were in the low to mid 50's. Sampling took place from around 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

Two general localities were sampled: E-1 (a fast, shallow riffle, just downhill from the Wagon's Ford Campground), and E-2 (long, slow pool immediately downstream of locality of E-1)

Aquatic Sampling in Riffle (Locality E-1): ~ 2 minutes of kicking rocks in fast riffle, roughly 12 inches deep, into macro net, positioned immediately downstream. Flipping rocks by hand produced abundant Isonychiid mayflies and several dobsonfly larvae, but no fish or crayfish. Time was spent looking for darters, but none were observed, despite perfectly clear water and seemingly favorable water/environmental conditions. Some small fish were seen, but appeared to either be Cyprinids or Poeciliids.

Notable observations from riffle samples:

  • By in large, predominant macroinvertebrate taxa present was Isonychiidae (Brush-Legged Mayflies). Specimens were impressively abundant. Estimated percentage of total collection comprised of this taxa is roughly 80-90%.
  • Corydalus (dobsonfly) larvae were present. 3 specimens were roughly 25-30 mm in length, but one specimen was over 80 mm.
  • Hydropsychidae (net-spinning caddisflies) abundance was high relative to collections made in Boerne area localities. Approximately 10-15 specimens were collected and observed.
  • Chironomids (non-biting midges) were present, but relatively sparse.
  • A small number of Heptageniids (stream mayflies) and other non-Isonychiid mayflies were observed and collected, but the samples were misplaced. Non-Isonychiids comprised an estimated 10% of mayflies observed.

-Small number of apparent Corbicula juveniles were collected. One small gastropod was collected, but sample was lost and specimen was not analysed. No other mollusks were noted.

Aerial Sampling (Locality E-1): A few minutes were dedicated to collecting flying insects along the bank adjacent to the riffle mentioned above. The sample consisted of roughly a dozen Chironomid adults.

Aquatic Sampling (Locality E-2): roughly 10 minutes was devoted to collecting from benthos and submerged roots in long, slow pool , approx 3'-4' deep, which was immediately donwstream of riffle described above. Submerged leafpacks were stirred and then netted. Samples were not analyzed or sorted carefully, but only one specimen was apparent when sample was observed: a single Macromiid (cruiser dragonfly) nymph. Submerged roots were scraped with net, but produced no immediately apparent macroinvertebrates.

Aerial Sampling (Locality E-2): Around 3:30 pm, a mayfly hatch was observed at the surface of the long, slow pool described above. imagos and subimagos were abundant, but only a short time was dedicated to collecting these adult specimens, and only two were captured and observed.

Publicado por mattgeo1990 mattgeo1990, 15 de enero de 2018

Observaciones

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Mosca de Pescar Oriental Corydalus cornutus

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:21 PM CST

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Mosca de Pescar Oriental Corydalus cornutus

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:48 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 03:44 PM CST

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Efímeras Y Parientes Orden Ephemeroptera

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 03:45 PM CST

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Libélulas Crucero Familia Macromiidae

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 03:58 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 04:11 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Polillas Peludas de Red Familia Hydropsychidae

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Escarabajos de Los Rápidos Familia Elmidae

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Almeja Canasta Asiática Corbicula fluminea

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Azulillas de Arroyo Género Argia

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Caballitos de Alas Angostas Familia Coenagrionidae

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 02:30 PM CST

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Mosquitos Enanos Familia Chironomidae

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mattgeo1990

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Enero 13, 2018 03:20 PM CST

Descripción

Aerial net

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Square

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mattgeo1990

Fecha

Enero 13, 2018 03:20 PM CST

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Aerial net

Comentarios

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How many people were involved in the survey. And did you need/receive special permission and permits, or just TPWD fishing license? Up here on the Pedernales, I'm seeing lots of waterfowl and a fair number of shore waders scouring the river. Conditions are too cold for me to wade in looking for any aquatic species and last time I did, scum covering the rocks made the wading pretty risky on the hard bedrock of the river as in many places the river is only inches to at most, several feet deep. Weather forecast for this week: ice and snow. Stay safe and warm. Don't get wet in this, hopefully, one last Arctic push of cold air.

Publicado por billarbon hace más de 2 años (Marca)
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Hi Bill! It was just me, myself, and I out there surveying on Saturday. As I understand it, you do need a permit to collect at a state park, but not to photograph and release. I did wear waders (I am a fly fisherman, so I am well equipped in that dept.) Yes, wading can be treacherous. In the future, I suggest getting yourself a wading staff (I've attached a link at the bottom of this comment to a wading staff that is available at Cabela's in Buda). That's neat to hear about the waterfowl at Pedernales. Yes I doubt I will be out wading this week, but by the time I go out this coming weekend the weather is supposed to be beautiful. I intend to come take at least one aquatic survey from the Pedernales River at some point in the future. If you are interested, I can let you know when I am coming, and you are welcome to join me. Hopefully you are right and this will be our last push of really cold weather. Hopefully it will stay cool through February so that the trout in the Guadalupe tailrace stay healthy for a while longer!

http://www.cabelas.com/product/WADING-STAFF/2196552.uts?productVariantId=4449675&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=04336771&rid=20&gclid=Cj0KCQiAv_HSBRCkARIsAGaSsrBI3UflNRtdCgZnR3-cY1M_A6VtKmbjXKHooYtvX9WMhrRw682Vv3kaApfhEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

Publicado por mattgeo1990 hace más de 2 años (Marca)
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Oh, and I forgot to ask (not that you didn't provide the coordinates) if the location was downstream of Canyon Lake. I don't do fly fishing (think you have to be patient and methodical, neither of which I am) except for a time when I was a kid visiting with family in Medford, OR. We used regular poles in a pond as I recall. Nothing technical. Now if you make your own flies, I am sure I can provide you with some feathers.

Per the Pedernales. All I have is wading boots. Where do you have in mind? I recommend here in Johnson City at the LCRA Nature Park because of said conditions and evidence of good flora/fauna in the river. I have set up a 'place' for the LCRA Pedernales River Nature Park. Look it up on places and see if that would interest you. Besides, it's a good place to see some geology on the river:-) In the meantime, weather conditions have to improve in order for me to want to wade in....shiver. Today is beautiful and after this week we should see lots more weather like today.

Here's the link: https://www.inaturalist.org/places/lcra-pedernales-river-nature-park

Cheers.

Publicado por billarbon hace más de 2 años (Marca)
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Bill,
Guadalupe River State Park is upstream of Canyon Lake. I am interested in taking some surveys downstream of the dam along the Canyon tailwater as well. That's funny about your fly fishing experience. It does take some patience to learn. I don't make too many flies, but I do have a small collection of feathers that I occasionally use for this purpose. Of course, in the spring, summer, and fall, wading boots alone will suffice. LCRA Pedernales River Nature Park does look like a good survey site, especially if there is public access to the riffle just downstream of the dam at the park. It would be interesting to compare biodiversity and biotic index (water quality indicator) of the locality just above and below the dam at this locality to that of other, more free-flowing localities on the Pedernales River. We'll wait for warmer air and water temps, and then, if you are still interested, we can take a field trip to your site. Thanks for the tip!

Publicado por mattgeo1990 hace más de 2 años (Marca)
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I just checked out the coordinates you provided on Google Earth. It's funny, because I live so close by, but I've never been to Guadalupe River State Park. We've spent most of our time locally, either at PFSP or Enchanted Rock because we shop in Fredericksburg. Looking at the photos, that's a beautiful park. No wonder you like to go there for your critter sampling and Trout fishing;-). To me one of the secrets of the Texas Hill Country is the riparian habitat along the rivers where sometimes huge Bald Cypress trees grow. Before the arrival of Europeans, the rivers must have been even grander than today - before the charcoal burners and Mormon mill wrights got to the trees to provide lumber for the building of Fredericksburg, and other communities. Knowing that many creeks flow into the Guadalupe, Blanco, Pedernales and other rivers to the southwest also held cypress trees, it's amazing to discover these secrets. Thanks to the wild and tumultuous nature of our rivers - as evidence of the 2015-16 floods, it's foolhardy to try to live in the flood plains of our rivers. Too bad there isn't a law outlawing such occupation. Otherwise we could have a whole state full of wild and scenic rivers.

Publicado por billarbon hace más de 2 años (Marca)

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